NEW Wetland Ecology and Management Units 2017

Courses presented by Damien Cook and Elaine Bayes.

These two 2-day courses can be done individually or as a four-day course.

Wetland Ecology Management units

Register for both courses and pay $1100 plus GST, instead of $1205 plus GST.

There are limited places (23-26) so get in early.

These units can be done together or separately.

Course location varies depending on where the best wetlands are for the training needs.

Click here to be added to our database and be contacted about upcoming courses

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UNIT 1: Wonderful Wetland Ecology bus tour 12 & 13 Oct 2017

In order to manage or restore a wetland it is essential to understand its ecological drivers. Ecological drivers (including, geomorphology, hydrology and water quality) determine the vegetation that grows and the suite of animals that will thrive in a particular wetland.

Join us on a tour through some of northern Victoria’s most ecologically diverse wetlands that will be looking their best because of recent rainfall and flooding. Learn how ecological drivers determine wetland ecology.

Date:   12 & 13 October 2017

Starts: Bendigo Train Station.  Starts 9.30am 12 October 2017 (People catching train from Melbourne get the 7.14am from Southern Cross Train Station, arrives Bendigo 9.24am)

Finishes:  Bendigo Train Station, 16.30 13 October 2017 (16.42 train leaves Bendigo, arrives Melbourne 18.43)

Learning Outcomes

  • Understanding key ecological drivers in wetlands: geomorphology, soils and hydrology.
  • How ecological drivers interact to form different wetland types that support different suites of species.
  • How to assess wetland condition.
  • How to manage the delivery of environmental water to assist the restoration of damaged wetlands.
  • Aboriginal use and management of wetlands.

Field Trip Location

  • Yando Swamp: Intermittent Swampy Woodland in centre, Lignum Swampy Woodland on shallower fringe.
  • Leaghur State Park: Black Box Wetland, Lignum Swampy Woodland, Plains Woodland/Herb-rich Gilgai Wetland Complex
  • Griffiths Lagoon: Lake Bed Herbland, Black Box Wetland and Lignum Swampy Woodland
  • Wirra-lo
  • Reedy Lagoon: Gunbower
  • Roslynmead: Plains Grassy Wetlands

  What is provided?

  • Lunch, morning and afternoon tea is provided both days (all food has vegetarian with gluten free options).  Snacks and fruit will be available throughout the day.
  • Evening meal provided at 7PM 12 October 2017 at the Kerang Exchange Hotel.
  • Breakfast is provided at 7.30 AM, 13 October 2017 at the Gospoda Eatery, 20 Victoria St, Kerang VIC 3579, 
  • Training notes
  • Bus transport around field sites and guest speakers
  • Accommodation is NOT provided.  Details of nearby venues are provided in the briefing notes.

Format: The format will be field based with a presentation in the evening.  Learnings will be based around observing 6 very different wetlands and through activities and discussion.

Cost:   $660 plus GST ($726).  Or register for both to receive a discount $1100 plus GST ($1210)

 

 

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UNIT 2: Wetland Restoration and Management
16 & 17 November 2017

Learn about wetland restoration and management with Damien Cook by visiting ‘Waterways’; an award-winning wetland restoration project which he was involved in planning and implementing.  This 40-hectare constructed and restored wetland in Braeside, south-east of Melbourne, received a Restoration Excellence Award from the Society for Ecological Restoration Australasia (SERA) in 2016.  Day 2 will look at the restoration works Damien helped plan and implement on 200 hectares of coastal park at the Victorian Desalination Plant, Wonthaggi.

Date: 16 & 17 November 2017, 9.00-5.00PM.

Presenters include: Damien Cook and Elaine Bayes and guest speakers

Format: Each day will be a mixture of time at the venue listed above and mostly in the field (see Field trip locations below). 

Learning Outcomes

  • Summary of Wetland hydrology and other key ecological drivers
  • Wetland Restoration and management principles
  • Society for Ecological Restoration Australia restoration guidelines
  • Practical aspects to planning and implementing ecological restoration
  • The use of reference ecosystems to guide restoration practice

Field Trip Location

  • Day 1: “Waterways”, SERA 2016 Restoration Excellence Award site; Braeside.
  • Day 2: Restored wetlands in the Wonthaggi Desalination Plant Coastal Park. One of the largest restoration projects in Victoria.
    • Restored brackish deep marsh
    • Restored freshwater meadow and fresh deep marsh

Read up on the details of these project sites at http://rakali.com.au/services/wetland-restoration-and-construction/

What is provided?

  • Lunch, morning and afternoon tea is provided both days (all food has vegetarian with gluten free options). Snacks and fruit will be available throughout the day.
  • Training notes
  • Guest speakers

What is provided?

  • Lunch, morning and afternoon tea is provided both days (all food has vegetarian with gluten free options). Snacks and fruit will be available throughout the day.
  • Training notes
  • Guest speakers

Cost:   $545 plus GST ($600).  Or register for both to receive a discount $1100 plus GST ($1210)

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Articles/Videos on Wetland Ecology and Management

Notes on Wetland Ecology and Restoration and field sites (coming soon)

 

Presenters

Damien has been instrumental in planning and implementing some of the largest and most complex ecological restoration projects to date in Australia, including the 40 hectare Waterways Estate south-east of Melbourne, recreation of coastal saltmarsh in the Marybyrnong River estuary and the restoration of a number of billabong on the Yarra River at Wonga Park.  Damien also assisted in developing the restoration of 200 hectares of coastal park at the Victorian Desalination Plant, Wonthaggi. Elaine Bayes is a passionate educator and wetland researcher who has many years’ experience in delivering high quality training courses.

Wetland Restoration and Management field sites

Wonthaggi Desalination Plant Coastal Reserve

Damien as director and senior ecologist at Australian Ecosystems worked in partnership with Thiess Degremont Joint Venture to undertake one of the largest and most complex landscape restoration projects in Australia. Damien assisted in the design, management and implementation of this 200-hectare project.  The site was predominantly farmland with small remnants of native vegetation.  Commencing in 2009 around 200 hectares of wetland and terrestrial habitat was created using more than 3.2 million indigenous plants of 250 different species (including 9 rare species), creating 12 different indigenous ecological vegetation classes (EVC’s), habitat for the nationally threatened Australasian Bittern and Australian Painted Snipe and the FFG-listed Swamp Skink. Project management included initial site assessment, design and documentation of restoration methods, seed collection, plant propagation and plant establishment and initial management.

“The Waterways” Estate, south-east of Melbourne

Damien, as director and senior ecologist at Australian Ecosystems (AE), worked with the team at AE to design and implement the award winning (UDIA Award for Water Sensitive Urban Design, 2001/2002 UDIA Award for Environmental Excellence, API award for SEAV State Environmental Development, 2016 SERA Restoration Excellence Award) 40 hectare Waterways Estate,  south-east of Melbourne.

June 2000

June 2000

December 2000

December 2000

February 2001

February 2001

The aim of the project was to use constructed wetlands to reduce the pollutant loads in Mordialloc Creek and recreate the habitats which originally occurred in the Carrum Carrum Swamp, a vast wetland complex which once stretched from Mordialloc to Kananook and as far inland as Keysborough.  Commencing in 2000 around 40 hectares of wetland and terrestrial habitat was created using more than 1.4 million indigenous plants of 223 different species, creating 10 different indigenous ecological vegetation classes (EVC’s).  This included 14 species of rare or threatened plants. The successful establishment of such diverse vegetation has so far attracted 102 species of native birds, and the wetlands on the site are home to 6 species of frogs.

Given optimal conditions, including natural wetting and drying and protection from water bird grazing, wetland vegetation can establish very rapidly. This sequence of photographs, taken over a nine-month period, shows vegetation establishment in a constructed wetland from newly constructed and bare of native species on the left to well vegetated with a high cover of indigenous plants and minimal weeds on the right.

 

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